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Although patients and physicians recognize the benefits of Ultra Violet B (UVB) treatment for skin conditions such as psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo, many people are unable to visit their doctors for frequent treatments.

There’s a new home therapy solution on the horizon: The Clarify ™ mobile UVB treatment system.  Even difficult-to-manage problems such as scalp psoriasis can be treated conveniently in the comfort of home. It’s UVB phototherapy,  a therapy proven safe and effective1.2,  managed by your doctor.

Clarify Medical intends to submit our innovative technology for FDA clearance in early 2017.

IT’S EASY

Just one button. No charts, protocol books or treatment logs. Your smartphone walks you through your prescribed treatment. The Clarify system records treatment data and forwards it to your physician.


IT’S CONVENIENT

The Clarify handheld device is truly portable, so you can comfortably administer treatment, even while watching TV. Our breakthrough lighting technology was developed to shorten the time required to deliver UVB therapy. The Clarify system was designed to offer effective therapy with minimal lifestyle impact. No appointments, no travel, no parking, no waiting

The Clarify system offers a  well established treatment for chronic skin conditions without  the traffic and parking problems, driving expenses– and hours of time– involved with  frequent in-office UVB treatments.


IT’S EMPOWERING

It’s YOUR schedule. Choose treatment times and reminder times that work for you, at home.


IT’S CONNECTED

Send treatment information and photos to your physician. Compare photos and see trends over time.

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THE CLARIFY MOBILE UVB TREATMENT SYSTEM

Phototherapy was approved in 1988 as an effective treatment for plaque psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo. Many physicians rely on UVB treatment as a vital resource in managing chronic skin conditions.  Its efficacy and safety have been demonstrated in a decade of clinical use and in many  published, peer-reviewed studies. 1.2.

THE CLARIFY UVB HANDHELD DEVICE 

• Handheld, sturdy, rechargeable

• New UVB lighting technology for efficient therapy delivery

• Activated only when placed on a surface.

•  Special attachment for treating scalp psoriasis

CLARIFY ON YOUR SMARTPHONE 

•  Follow your physician’s prescription, access protocol and  treatment records

•  View your schedule, choose treatment days and times

•  Set reminder times

•  Record treatment area photos and compare over time

•  Send treatment data and messages to your physician.

CLARIFY SUPPORT 

• Call center help line, staffed by Clarify experts

• Summary and expanded physician reporting.

CLARIFY™ SYSTEM RESERVATION PROGRAM

– FIRST 100 PATIENTS –

– 30 Day Refund Policy –

EARLY ACCESS, DISCOUNTED PRICE, NO SERVICE FEE, NO OBLIGATION TO PAY

If you are among the first 100 patients who sign up for the Clarify reservation program, you will have early access to our mobile UVB treatment system – at a special introductory price.

If you act now, you can reserve a Clarify system for the introductory price of$699, a $100 savings over the Clarify system price of $799. Clarify will also waive the monthly service fee of $9.99 for 12 months.  That’s over $200 off!

Clarify Medical plans to submit our technology for FDA clearance early in 2017 and expects to receive clearance later in the year. As soon as FDA clearance is received, we will call you to confirm your order and assist you in obtaining a prescription  from your doctor.

Money Back Guarantee

Clarify Medical offers a 30-day money back guarantee for all patients whose system use demonstrates that they have complied with their physician’s home UVB prescription. If you are not satisfied with the effectiveness of your Clarify home UVB therapy program within 30 days, you may return the system for a full refund.

No charge will be made on your credit card until we receive your confirmation and prescription.

To place your reservation now, fill out the information below and submit.  Thank you.


 

1. “Guidelines of care for the treatment of psoriasis with phootherapy and photochemotherapy” Menter et al. J Am Acad Dermatolo 2010;62:114-35
2. “Phototherapy in Psoriasis: A Review of Mechanisms of Action” Wang et al. J Cutan Med Surg 2013; 17(1): 6-12 (between this two elements)

Who we are

Jim SweeneyJim Sweeney

Jim Sweeney

CEO
Martyn GrossMartyn Gross

Martyn Gross

Dr. Charlene KakimotoDr. Charlene Kakimoto

Dr. Charlene Kakimoto

Andre GamelinAndre Gamelin

Andre Gamelin

Don CanalDon Canal

Don Canal

Doug Eveland, Ph.DDoug Eveland, Ph.D

Doug Eveland, Ph.D

Larry WattsLarry Watts

Larry Watts

Wael AhwalWael Ahwal

Wael Ahwal

Remo Moomiaie-Qajar, MDRemo Moomiaie-Qajar, MD

Remo Moomiaie-Qajar, MD

CLARIFY™ NEWS AND BLOG

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Scaly Scalp Treatment: A Dermatologist’s Tips

Scaly Scalp Treatment: A Dermatologist’s Tips

‘Tis the season for holiday parties, and everyone wants to look their best.  So who wants snowflakes on their shoulders? This blog is for anyone with a scaly scalp, looking…

scalyscalp ‘Tis the season for holiday parties, and everyone wants to look their best.  So who wants snowflakes on their shoulders? This blog is for anyone with a scaly scalp, looking for additional help.  This is for anyone with an itchy scalp, looking for additional help. As a clinical dermatologist with over a decade of experience, I have some simple recommendations you may be able to try on your own, at low cost, before heading yet again into your doctor’s office.   Stop scratching! Easier said than done— for sure.  Consider taking an oral antihistamine at bedtime, as the ones that make you sleepy, tend to work the best.  Be sure to run this by your healthcare provider, especially if you have drug allergies or take multiple medications—a phone call or secure email inquiry will do.  Generally, 50 mg of Benadryl does the trick! If you have open sores, your clinician may consider a course of oral antibiotics, as secondary infections can cause itchiness and a worsening rash.  If your doctor doesn’t see overt signs of infection (such as swelling, warmth, redness, tenderness, bogginess or yellow discharge/crust), he or she may still prescribe a lower, non-antimicrobial dose of antibiotic.  Newer versions of antibiotics may be used for their anti-inflammatory properties. And remember, there is some truth to the itch-scratch-rash cycle, especially with regards to scalp psoriasis.  Although it may be tempting to scratch that itchy, scaly scalp to death with a hairbrush or fingernails, please know YOU may be making your psoriasis worse!  Heinrich Kobner described this phenomenon, known as the Kobner phenomenon, where skin lesions will appear in the areas of minor trauma including scratching, rubbing, or sunburn.  So if you are scratching, then you may be propagating your psoriasis lesions.   Oil under occlusion can be your best friend Thick scale on the scalp can be a real pain—literally and figuratively.  If you aren’t removing it first, to “prime” your scalp skin for the real workhorse of topical corticosteroids, then you might as well be a dog chasing its tail. Kitchen oils such as olive or coconut oils will do just as fine as medical grade mineral and peanut oils.  Baker P&S solution contains phenol to help numb and exfoliate, while prescription corticosteroid Derma-Smoothe FS scalp oil soothes inflammation.  These are obtained only by prescription, so be sure to ask your doctor. Place your oil, or medicated oil, under a shower cap or warm wet head wrap, turban-style, for a half hour or even overnight to facilitate softening and breaking down the dead skin. peanut-oil No need to do this messy oil treatment nightly, although you certainly can for periods when you have very thick scales.  I’d recommend doing this only when you need it—when you have a layer of dead skin that makes your topical medications or light treatment impenetrable. For some, this may be as often as once a week to every couple of weeks. Or feel free to perform more frequently if you prefer the soothing aspects of the oil, which many do!   Descale gently with a brush or comb Now that you’ve softened up the thick, dead skin, it should be less traumatizing and less painful to remove.  Gently, yes GENTLY, use a shampoo massager brush or comb with rounded, smooth bristles to remove the scale without harming the delicate living skin below.   Banish unwanted bugs Everyone has organisms living on and in their skin, and the delicate balance of the microbial environment changes over time and with various circumstances.  The shift in flora can create itchiness and facilitate inflammation—redness, swelling, and scaliness. This may be a great time to use a medicated shampoo, especially an antifungal or antimicrobial shampoo to further treat the skin on your scalp.  Try a shampoo with the active ingredient of zinc pyrithione, selenium sulfide, ketoconazole or tea tree oil.  There are many over-the-counter options, as well as those of prescription strengths. bugs And just because you’ve tried one active ingredient, please don’t think all medicated shampoos don’t work for you!  Because each ingredient has a different antimicrobial spectrum, you may do better with a shampoo containing a different active ingredient at a different point in time.  Many of my patients have one bottle of each in their bathroom and rotate use every couple of weeks. Even when your scale seems to be in-check, I recommend continuing a “maintenance” medicated shampoo a day or two a week, as the antimicrobials also have the secondary effect of decreasing inflammation.  Using a medicated shampoo is much easier than using a topical steroid, and with fewer side effects! If you prefer a scalp rinse, 1 part apple cider vinegar to 3 parts water does the trick.  Be aware, it may sting initially but works well for alleviating itch and as a natural antiseptic.  If you have color treated hair, be sure to ask your stylist for advice.  While your skin may fare well, your colored locks may do better with a medicated shampoo.   Soak, then rinse Now this next piece of advice, is a dermatologic pearl—one that patients and fellow clinicians always appreciate and offer me thanks for explaining.  I always educate my patients that medicated shampoos are best thought of as a medication that comes in a vehicle of a shampoo.  They are not intended to be used as typical shampoos— to be rinsed off immediately after application.  Instead, I prefer to call it a “soaking scalp lather.” Be sure to massage the shampoo into the skin of the scalp, leaving it in place for at least 5 minutes, prior to rinsing.  Prolonged contact allows for penetration of the active ingredients into the skin, instead of being rinsed away as a typical shampoo.   Consider a hair product elimination trial A scaly scalp should not limit use of your favorite shampoo and other hair care products…most of the time.  The caveat here, is contact irritation and allergy.  This can occur over time and to dyes, fragrances, and even natural and organic ingredients. If you experience itchiness after using your shampoo or hair care product, then it may be a good idea to try a hair care product “elimination.”  If you can go without products, then try to do so and see if it makes any difference in your symptoms.  If you feel this is absolutely not an option for you, do a trial of a hypoallergenic shampoo made specifically for patients with cosmetic allergies and free of dye, fragrance, and preservatives.  Vanicream is a good brand to try.  You can purchase online or ask your pharmacist to order this OTC product for you.  (They also happen to make hypoallergenic conditioner.) So after using a medicated shampoo to treat your skin condition, feel free to now use your favorite shampoo and conditioner to treat your hair.  You may need to do this a few times depending on how much oil you used.   The “primed” scalp is the ready scalp Your scalp skin is now “primed” and ready to receive your topical anti-inflammatory medication(s) and/or light therapy—treatments that will address the root cause: inflammation in the skin. Topical corticosteroids are powerful anti-inflammatory medications and are the most frequently prescribed.  They come in several different vehicles: liquid, spray, foam, cream and ointment pending your preference.  Many of my patients prefer the spray or foam forms for the scalp.  These forms tend to cost more, so many of my patients create their own sprays by putting the liquid form into their own spray bottles. Be sure to discuss with your prescriber how often you should be applying your medication, including the maximum number of consecutive days of use.  While these medications work well, “tachyphylaxis” or tolerance can develop, as can other side effects such as skin thinning or acne-like rash. At times, systemic cortisol levels can be altered and lead to serious health effects when applied to larger body surface areas frequently. As a result of the side effects of topical steroids, many clinicians recommend combined or rotational use of other topical medications.  Other anti-inflammatory topicals include vitamin D3 analogues, calcineurin inhibitors, anthralin, and coal tar products. Light therapy can be another steroid-sparing anti-inflammatory treatment to use in your rotation of treatments. With regard to light therapy, be sure to discuss the order of your topical therapy applications with your provider.  Some topicals, such as mineral oil, Vaseline oil or glycerol may enhance UVB penetration, while other topicals, including prescriptions, may block UVB.  And yet other topicals work well used in conjunction with UVB but must be applied after phototherapy to be most effective.   Not all topical scalp medications are created equal While the beta hydroxy acid salicylic acid and alpha hydroxy acids, such as glycolic and lactic acids, are also topical medications used for scaly, scalp conditions, I think of them as chemical descalers or “keratolytics” used to enhance the breaking up of the dead, thick scales rather than addressing the root skin inflammation. I’ve found my patients prefer their use as a shampoo or scalp spray to be used for thin scalp scales or for maintenance topical therapy. Anthralin and topical retinoids also are used for psoriasis but work in a slightly different manner to help normalize and slow down the hyperactive development of thick, scaly skin.  While coal tar appears to help both shed the top layers of dead skin cells and slow down the rapid development of skin cells. Most of my patients declare Neutrogena T-gel shampoo a “must-have” in their showers.   Rotate your medicated shampoos I know I’ve mentioned this bit of advice in a slightly different form already, but I’m going to say it again as it simply cannot be impressed upon enough. Just because you’ve tried one shampoo, please do not think medicated shampoos do not work for you. Each active ingredient works in a slightly different way and may work better at different points in time. It’s important to discuss with your healthcare provider, as well as educate yourself, on when it’s best to use each one. Many of my patients have a shampoo library in their bathrooms, rotating use of each one at a several week interval, to address inflammation, microbial balance, and hyperactive skin development in different ways.   The rise of personalized, digital medicine offers hope If you are reading this blog, then you already know how challenging it is to care for an itchy, scaly scalp. You know there is no cure, and that there will be good scalp days and bad scalp days. And yes, it is a lot of work!  A LOT of work! Your lives revolve around caring for your skin. We need to help one another and change this. I hope some of my advice has helped to clarify some misconceptions about how to best address itch, prime your scalp, and get the best efficacy of your topical medications and light therapy. As you know, chronic skin disorders are complex with no two people alike, and triggers vary and change in time. With the rise of the digital age, and the ability for us to share information about health and disease with greater ease via our smartphones and laptops, I hope you will share your experiences and tips with me. I always welcome a fresh perspective, as we’re all in this pursuit together. Email Dr. Kakimoto at charlene@clarifymed.com
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5 Simple Tips to Optimize Topical Steroids

5 Simple Tips to Optimize Topical Steroids

With some simple recommendations, we may be able to better optimize topical treatments and enhance outcomes.

steroids As a clinical dermatologist of over a decade, with experience in both an academic hospital setting and small, community private practice, I’ve seen hundreds to thousands of psoriasis patients. And although there is no cure for psoriasis, there are some really great therapies—from topicals to diet, light and stress reduction, antibiotics, and systemic immunosuppressives and biologics. Yet—we’re still struggling. There are flares and rebounds, periods of waxing and waning, and certainly no therapy fits all. So, it becomes even more important for us to take the time to slow down and have a real conversation about how we’re using our medications and about how we’re caring for our skin. With some simple recommendations, we may be able to better optimize topical treatments and enhance outcomes.  
  1. Wait—don’t pick those scales off!
Although it may be tempting to pick off those white flakes and get your topical medication closer to where it’s needed most, beware—you may be making your psoriasis worse! Heinrich Kobner described this phenomenon, known as the Kobner phenomenon, where skin lesions will appear in the areas of trauma. A few skin conditions exhibit this phenomenon, and psoriasis and vitiligo are two of them. I can’t tell you how many Marines I’ve known who complained of their stubborn shin psoriasis, only to realize their rubbing boots as the culprit.  
  1. Consider the source of your itchiness
If your psoriasis tends to be itchy and causing you to scratch, then consider the source. Be sure you’ve discussed this symptom with your physician. Sometimes there may be underlying causes of itchiness such as secondary infection or an internal cause. Consider taking an oral antihistamine such as benadryl at bedtime. At times, your healthcare provider may recommend one that is stronger or consider a different class of medication to help get control of that stubborn itch.  
  1. Hydrate your skin, then lock in the moisture
If your skin is dry, it will likely be itchy. Be sure to hydrate and moisturize. Soothing baths are great to not only hydrate the skin, but reduce stress, a known trigger for many skin rashes. Try avoiding harsh soaps that may further dry or irritate your compromised skin. Instead, opt for plain, warm water or the addition of colloidal oatmeal, Dead Sea salts or Epsom salts. Pat your skin dry or use your hands to gently wipe off wet skin. Slather on your favorite moisturizer while your skin is still damp. If your skin is still feeling dry after using a lotion, consider a cream. If your skin is still dry after a cream, consider an oil or ointment. In general, your skin should feel soothed by your emollient. If you experience burning or itching, you may want to reduce fragrance, preservatives, and any other active ingredients to minimize contact allergy or irritation.  
  1. Descale GENTLY
Ridding yourself of those messy scales not only feels incredibly satisfying and smooth, but also helps to prepare your skin for the real workhorse topical medications, such as corticosteroids. Without descaling, treatment takes longer or may be ineffective, as topicals will remain sitting on top of dead skin, or in the case of light therapy, end up reflecting off the scaly skin. Topical keratolytics such as products containing salicylic acid, urea or alpha-hydroxy acids, such as glycolic and lactic acids, help to gently soften and break-up dead skin proteins, keratins. Topical retinoids, such as tazarotene, can also be used to help normalize the revved up skin cycle and shed thickened, dead skin. As there are several different forms to be used—liquids, lotions, creams, and ointments—in a variety of strengths, be sure to discuss with your prescriber proper application, removal, and frequency of use. Some can be so powerful, they may be used to remove thickened toenails! And irritation is common, so it’s best to honor those symptoms and treat itchiness and stinging with use of topical corticosteroids. In fact, combination keratolytic-corticosteroids may be preferred. Alternatively, or in addition, oil under occlusion can also help to descale gently. I particularly like this method of descaling for the scalp. Kitchen oils such as olive or coconut oils will do just as fine as medical grade mineral and peanut oils. Place under a shower cap or warm wet head wrap, turban-style, for a half hour or even overnight to facilitate softening and breaking down the dead skin. Gently, yes GENTLY, use a shampoo massager brush or comb/brush with rounded, smooth bristles to remove the scale without traumatizing the delicate skin below. This may be a great time to use a medicated shampoo (AKA scalp medication that comes in the form of a shampoo meant to be left on for 5 minutes prior to rinsing)—antifungal, antimicrobial, or tar-based—to further treat your scalp skin and remove the oily residue. (You may then follow with your favorite shampoo and conditioner to treat your hair.) Your scalp skin is now “primed” and ready to receive your topical medication, which may include a corticosteroid. Please note, you’ll want to use this descaling technique a few days before initiating light therapy as some medications may be UV blocking.  
  1. Take a topical steroid holiday
Topical corticosteroids work wonders to relieve itch, redness, and inflammation, but we want them to continue to work when we need them most. Be sure to discuss with your provider, the recommended application and frequency. A little goes a long way! There is no need to slather it on, although I may advise patients to slather a thick layer of moisturizer on top to occlude it and enhance penetration. And be sure to understand that it’s important to take a steroid holiday to avoid tolerance or tachyphylaxis. If used over two weeks, I generally recommend taking a few days off, such as the weekend. Be sure to discontinue use once you can close your eyes and feel there is no difference between the affected skin and normal appearing skin. No one wants to trade thickened skin for thinned skin. With drug advances, we have an ever-increasing number of great therapies, yet sometimes our greatest successes may be found in the details of how we care for our skin—from itch control to bathing and preparing your skin for proper contact and absorption of topical medications and light therapies.   Please spread these simple tips with others who may need some help with their skin. Together, let’s try to better optimize first-line topical treatments and facilitate more “good-skin” days.
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Treatment from the DEAD Sea: Happy Halloween from Clarify

Treatment from the DEAD Sea: Happy Halloween from Clarify

Treatment from the Dead Sea If you are someone who has been diagnosed with psoriasis or vitiligo but concerned about the long list of potential short and long-term effects of…

deadsea

Treatment from the Dead Sea

If you are someone who has been diagnosed with psoriasis or vitiligo but concerned about the long list of potential short and long-term effects of traditional or biologic therapy, then read on. If you are someone who is already being treated by a systemic therapy, but still have stubborn skin areas that need further improvement, then read on. I’d like to share with you a century old therapy, considered safe and effective by dermatologists worldwide, but has fallen out of favor due to inconvenience and inaccurate negative portrayal of risk. Today, we call it phototherapy or light therapy. And on this day, on Halloween, it is only fitting that I share with you its origins in Dead Sea Climatotherapy. (And now that I think about it, this will make a very intriguing bedtime story for my two young boys, as they are fascinated by all things ghosts, graveyards and anything containing the word “dead.”) The Dead Sea sits in the heart of the Great Syrian Africa Rift valley and is the lowest point on Earth at 1320 feet below sea level. The waters contain a number of minerals, many of which are not found in other oceans, and is the only place on earth where sunbathing for long hours is possible with little or no sunburn because the ultraviolet rays are filtered through three layers; an atmospheric layer, an evaporation layer, and a thick ozone layer. Many psoriasis visitors have praised the therapeutic benefits of the Dead Sea, helping to clear their skin condition with a remission period following. Frequent visitors claim that the remission periods get longer each year, and note their condition is less severe than the time before. Great— Dead Sea spa sunbathing sounds lovely, BUT—with a rising awareness and rising incidence of skin cancer, just how risky is light therapy? And how risky is it compared to systemic biologics?

What is Phototherapy?

Light therapy, also known as phototherapy, is the use of UV light for its therapeutic effects to suppress local immunity in the skin. A particular spectrum of light (safer than sunlight aka heliotherapy and much safer than tanning beds associated with an increased risk of melanoma) is applied to the skin for a treatment typically lasting minutes. Yes, minutes— NOT hours! The most common skin conditions treated include:
  • Psoriasis
  • Vitiligo
  • Eczematous (atopic) dermatitis
  • Seborrheic dermatitis
  • Scalp dermatitis
  • Chronic hand dermatitis
  • Other forms of dermatitis
A history of your skin condition improving in sun-exposed areas or during sunnier seasons of the year may suggest you’d be a good candidate for this type of therapy. Targeted phototherapy, which applies light to the affected skin, and only the affected skin, is considered a first-line therapy along with topical medications (such as creams) for psoriasis, and is considered a second-line therapy for vitiligo and atopic dermatitis (chronic eczema) after topicals.  

How effective is it?

Treatment options have expanded in recent years, and UV light therapy remains an essential and effective therapeutic option for many patients.   It may be considered in combination with other therapies, in rotation, or as a step therapy prior to beginning traditional immunosuppressive agents or biologic therapies which have the potential of significant systemic side effects. Narrowband UVB (NB-UVB) is most commonly prescribed and clearance may be seen within 2 weeks. Most psoriasis patients require 15-20 treatments to achieve clearance, and experience a remission rate of 38% after 1 year. Maintenance therapy, typically involving once weekly treatment, is recommended.

 

Does NB-UVB cause skin cancer?

How dermatologists approach UV light can be very confusing. On one hand, dermatologists advocate for sun avoidance and protection. Daily, we see its effects in patients who present with sun-sensitive skin disorders, sun-related aging, and most significantly, skin cancers. Yet, on the other hand, dermatologists prescribe light therapy. Patients with chronically inflamed skin, such as those living with psoriasis and vitiligo, have a revved up immune response in the skin. UV light has the ability to decrease the local immune system, thus clearing burdensome rashes. Much can be inferred from mouse studies which have shown an increase in nonmelanoma skin cancer after chronic NB-UVB irradiation. In the few human studies evaluating this concern, an increased incidence of skin cancer has not been demonstrated in psoriasis patients who have undergone NB-UVB phototherapy. The most recent study looking at this issue is a 2013 Swedish cross-sectional study of 162 psoriasis patients treated with phototherapy. In this population, the risk of skin cancer correlated with the patients’ age and number of NB-UVB treatments. The median number of previous phototherapy treatments was 260 (range 100–1,683). However, the estimated cumulative rate of skin cancer in psoriasis patients investigated did not differ from the general population in Sweden. In a Scottish study of 3867 patients treated with NB-UVB, in which the median number of treatments was 29 (with 352 patients receiving more than 100 treatments), there was no significant association found with basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, or melanoma. And the median follow-up period was 5.5 years. Furthermore, other experts point out that because response and clearance time with NB-UVB compared to broadband UVB is faster, total exposure time and minimal erythema dose (MED) equivalent used in this therapy is far less. As a result, long-term risk of skin cancer development may not be enhanced. Certainly, we need larger and longer-term prospective studies in this area.   A cautious, and middle of the road, response is that NB-UVB is probably associated with an increased risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer.   Even with this knowledge in mind, NB-UVB light therapy is still considered among dermatologists to be safe and effective when used responsibly, weighing the risks versus benefits for each individual patient. And targeted phototherapy is considered in the armamentarium of first-line therapies for many chronic inflammatory skin conditions. For patients living with these lifelong skin conditions, many of the alternate treatment options—immune lowering chemotherapy pills and injectable biologic agents— have more toxic, multi-organ side effects. Increased risk of serious infections, lymphoma, acute and chronic leukemias and nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancer have been reported and are noted on the pharmaceutical’s “important safety information.”  

So why aren’t more people choosing light therapy?

A large reason for its decline of use, is inconvenience and cost for patients—phototherapy is typically in-office, and at a frequency of 2-5 times a week for several months. Maintenance therapy is typically once a week. Similarly, there is an increasing financial disincentive for physicians. Not only are light therapy booths costly for providers, especially if the demographics of their patient population do not support its regular and frequent use, reimbursement trends reveal Medicare audits for these procedures are rising. Traditional home therapy units exist, but they often leave patients with the burden and confusion of self-managing. And providers also lose out on oversight of compliance and proper technique. Without prescription control, the potential for liability is great. Soon to be FDA-cleared, Clarify Medical has developed a handheld, mobile NB-UVB device with mobile app connectivity that addresses some of the pain-points for patients and prescribers. With it’s small footprint, the device is more convenient to use, and minimizes treatment of unaffected skin. Patients now can perform more targeted therapy in the comfort of their home and meanwhile remain connected to their practitioners. And health care providers can now prescribe phototherapy easily through a web-based portal and monitor progress on their own time.   I think it’s time to reconsider what is best for ourselves, and for our patients, if you are a healthcare provider. Many times, the answer is a new therapy. And sometimes, yes once in awhile, the solution may be an old therapy presenting itself in a new light. I think it’s time for us all to rethink light therapy.  

References

Menter A, Korman NJ, Elmets CA, Feldman SR, Gelfand JM, Gordon KB, Gottlieb A, Koo JY, Lebwohl M, Lim HW, Van Voorhees AS, Beutner KR, Bhushan R. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis Section 5. Guidelines of care for the treatment of psoriasis with phototherapy and photochemotherapy. J Am Acad Dermatol 2010;62:114-35. Vassantachart JM, Soleymani T, Wu JJ. Comparison of Phototherapy Guidelines for Psoriasis: A Critical Appraisal and Comprehensive Review. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016 Aug 1;15(8):995-1000. Osmancevic A, Gillstedt M, Wennberg AM, Larkö O. The risk of skin cancer in psoriasis patients treated with UVB therapy. Acta Derm Venereol. 2014 Jul;94(4):425-30. Hearn RM, Kerr AC, Rahim KF, Ferguson J, Dawe RS. Incidence of skin cancers in 3867 patients treated with narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy. Br J Dermatol. 2008 Sep;159(4):931-5. Kunisada M , Kumimoto H, Ishizaki K, Sakumi K, Nakabeppu Y, Nishigori C. Narrow-Band UVB Induces More Carcinogenic Skin Tumors than Broad-Band UVB through the Formation of Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimer. Journal of Investigative Dermatology (2007) 127, 2865–2871.
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Seeking the Truth in Medicine

Seeking the Truth in Medicine

We’d like to introduce you to Charlene Kakimoto MD, Chief Medical Officer at Clarify.  Dr. Kakimoto is a Board Certified Dermatologist who is passionate about making innovation and entrepreneurship fulfill the needs…

kakimototruth We'd like to introduce you to Charlene Kakimoto MD, Chief Medical Officer at Clarify.  Dr. Kakimoto is a Board Certified Dermatologist who is passionate about making innovation and entrepreneurship fulfill the needs of patients. I have been a practicing physician for 17 years now, in academic military medicine, private practice, and more recently on the forefront of telemedicine startups, and it’s been both exciting and unsettling to see the changes in medicine. On some days, I find myself asking if I am seated at the exciting nexus of healthcare and technology, or if I am having a bit of a midlife crisis. I think the answer is probably both—and that the healthcare sector itself is going through the very same soul searching. Our smartphones have enabled us to communicate faster and more efficiently with patients and with one another. In many ways, I feel I am able to have a more personalized experience with patients, being able to securely and freely dialogue back and forth, qualifying questions, and clarifying explanations. Patients are able to send me their skin care routine, links to the exact creams they are using, the teas they are drinking, and surprising skin rituals or recipes with which they are experimenting. I have found it fun and truly fascinating as I’ve explored the internet world and social communities with my patients as my guide. While in some regards, digital communication with patients has facilitated a more personalized, convenient, and efficient practice, I find it challenging at times as well. Is there such thing as too much information or too much communication? In some instances, yes, and in some instances, no. While having information at our fingertips may facilitate greater knowledge, it alone can not guarantee understanding of context and trust. We still need quality of interaction, and effective interactions, and this is where human relations are so vital. Digital communication may allow us greater opportunities for convenient collisions but ultimately the patient-provider relationship still needs to be the right fit. And while I feel greatly satisfied by educating, alleviating pain, and making a difference in someone’s life, I also struggle in maintaining my own—and sometimes that means a need for personal privacy, going off the grid, and not having the pressure to always be available. And I simply can not, be responsible and medically liable for the infinite amount of data that can possibly be sent my way these days. Makes, sense, huh? Yup—doctors are not robots. Alert—let me repeat—doctors (and other health care practitioners) are not robots. We are human, too. While the rise of digital medicine brings great promise for personalized medicine, more efficient health care, and more affordable and accessible health care, the reality is that there are and will be growing pains for everyone as we figure out how to best use this technology in medicine. We will need to rethink and refine our expectations of one another, rethink and refine what is best, and rethink and refine what is the truth in medicine. The pursuit of finding innovative, better ways of providing healthcare is not easy. It is not glamorous. And yes, there is doubt at every corner. And of course, there is cost. Trying to find a better way to do things, takes effort and cost. But innovation that is worth pursuing, is worth doing. Without it, we’ll have so much to lose, and with it we’ll have so much to gain. The truth is: telehealth is here, and it does not look as though it is going away. And I am here for the pursuit and journey. I want to find a better way for my patients, for my practitioner colleagues, for my children, and their children, and their children. I am proud to be a part of the Clarify team, a team committed and passionate about figuring this all out. We are dreamers and visionaries, patients and doctors, engineers and developers, entrepreneurs and designers, mothers and fathers, and at the core of it all, we are people searching for a better way to care for one another. Please join us, in any way you can, in seeking the truth. There's got to be a better way. Together, I know we'll find it. Have questions for the doctor?  Let us know!
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Slow Down and Read This: Stress Can Lead to Flare-Ups

Slow Down and Read This: Stress Can Lead to Flare-Ups

For me, stress and psoriasis have always seem to go hand-in-hand.  I first really noticed my psoriasis when I was carrying a lot of stress, and since then, whenever stress…

calm
For me, stress and psoriasis have always seem to go hand-in-hand.  I first really noticed my psoriasis when I was carrying a lot of stress, and since then, whenever stress comes, I seem to have a flare-up.  When I had flare-ups, I lost sleep, I was concerned about what people thought about my psoriasis, and there was a constant concern over what prescriptions were active, how much medications cost, and if I could make it to a phototherapy booth.  This all caused more stress, which caused more psoriasis!
Stress may cause psoriasis.  Here’s a few things I’ve learned along the way to stop this cycle.
 
Calm 
I’m a firm believer in finding and fixing root causes.  This is going to sound very California, but just go here with me:
If we’re talking about stress, that means being honest and dealing with the conversations we have in our brain all day, every day.  Our brains are always processing, and this constant thinking will pull in areas of worry and concern.  All of us have a small, controlled fire of stress that keeps us alert and alive, but concerns can easily become fuel for a wildfire of stress.  One thing I’ve found that is very helpful is to take 5 minutes to calmly think about all the good that exists in my life.  If you are reading this, for example, you have lots to be thankful for.  Your path in life allowed you to know how to read and you have the economic means to access information.  It might sound hippie-hippie, but thinking like this can get you to a place where you realize most of your life is probably something you can be grateful for.
If you want to take a deeper dive, consider downloading an app called Calm.  Honestly, I can be very cynical and tend to view much of the mindfulness movement skeptically.  But I’m not skeptical of the effects: when I used the app to learn how to calm, and practice 10 minutes of it in a workday, the next hour is usually the least stressful, most productive and most enjoyable of the whole day.
Release Endorphins
There are chemicals in your body called endorphins that, when released, cause you to feel better, excited or satisfied.  These are released during sex and exercise.
I started using FitBit to track my calories and exercise.  Let me be clear, this was not for stress reduction, I just wanted to look better and live longer.  I ended up walking, jogging and then running often. I began to get trimmer, lose weight, and, to my surprise, feel both more energized and more calm.  I lost some weight, but most of all, I felt good.
I’m not suggesting you watch inspirational YouTube videos and try out for American Ninja Warrior. I’m just saying you should just be mindful of how a walk, a jog, a bike ride or swimming makes you feel.  If you’re really paying attention, you’ll realize you are calmer and feel better.  Shouldn’t this make you want to exercise more?
 
Your schedule can cause or kill stress 
I have no room to say this since I work at a startup, but my stress is significantly lower when I don’t feel like I’m being pulled a million different directions and there’s just not enough time in the day to get stuff done.  What I do every Sunday evening, then, is to loosely map out my schedule for the week - what work priorities are most important, when I exercise, who I’m spending time with.
I try to make sure I get high work priorities on the calendar in blocked time periods.  I first started doing this years ago by not answering emails or getting distracted by smaller tasks in order to achieve these high priority items.  I also realized that if something takes less than three minutes to do, I should usually just get it done instead of writing it down on a to-do list - but not during these larger blocks of time.  With focus comes stress reduction.
I use both Calendars 5 and ToDoist to prioritize stuff and get that stuff scheduled.  Our brains are wired to organize information from the time we are toddlers, so getting that organizing activity out of our heads and onto an app frees us up to be focused and reduce stress.
 
Breathe 
Finally, one thing that really helped from Calm: remember to breathe.  Do this right now and watch what happens: sit up a little straighter, breathe deeply (inhale, hold for a second, exhale) five times and just feel what happens.
Imagine what it would be like if your whole day was breathing deeply, staying mentally focused and feeling physically fit.
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To recap: breathe, focus on the good, plan your schedule so you can focus on tasks, and while you’re scheduling get some exercise in when you know you’ll be motivated to work out.  Your psoriasis just might stay a bit more in control.
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What is PASI?

What is PASI?

You may be reading this because: a) you’ve got psoriasis, and, b) you’ve gone down the Google-search rabbit hole to try and find more information on your lifelong condition only…

You may be reading this because:
a) you’ve got psoriasis, and,
b) you’ve gone down the Google-search rabbit hole to try and find more information on your lifelong condition only to find a disorienting maze of natural Hawaiian oils, cancerous side effects and something (?) called “PASI”.  You’ll notice PASI 50 here and PASI 75 there.  Every study talks about 75% PASI 75.   What exactly is PASI?  🤔
whatispaso
PASI is a way to measure psoriasis.
What I’ve seen is that PASI is used two different ways - the one that is useful to me and the one that is used to measure how much of my body is affected by psoriasis.
1) The useless PASI:  A complicated measurement of how much psoriasis you have.  I personally use a scale of “annoying” to “driving me crazy,” so this is less helpful for me.
2) The useful PASI:
I want to know how effective psoriasis treatments are.  Psoriasis medications usually say that a certain percentage of people reach PASI 75.  That means how many patients, usually after 12 weeks of treatment, see 75% of their psoriasis improved (by scaling, redness and thickness) or even cleared up.
Systemics:For example, the study Otezla likes to advertise shows 33% of patients reaching PASI 75 (75% improvement).  Most times, this is referred to as "33% PASI 75.”  This is very helpful to me.  That means only 1 out of 3 people reached the industry standard of PASI 75.  The most common side effects were diarrhea, nausea and headache for 2 weeks along with possible depression.  Ok then. 😳
Topicals: Compare this with topical steroids.  Clobetasol-propionate foam (which would be great for scalp psoriasis, right?) led to 42% PASI 75 and 58% PASI 75.  So instead of Otezla’s 1 out 3 people reaching the industry standard PASI 75, 1 out 2 people reached it with Clobetasol-propionate foam.  Not exciting, but I hate scalp psoriasis and anything is helpful.
UVB Therapy: Generally, with UVB therapy, it’s harder to find PASI studies, but you can find lots of studies on “resolution," meaning the clearance of symptoms.  For instance, the AAD reports that 88% of patients on narrowband UVB reach “rapid clearing.”  Cool.
socool
Biologics: Now let’s look at the nuclear option. .
These are life-changing, immune-suppressing injections appropriate for people with psoriasis all over their body.  Enbrel only leads to 46% PASI 75, but being from San Diego, I like it because Phil Mickelson (a San Diegan) is in their commercials and this medication is  great for people with psoriatic arthritis.
I take Humira for my psoriatic arthritis myself and it has changed my life.  I go rock climbing now but only 3 years ago I couldn’t grab a door handle. My psoriasis has grown steadily worse while I’ve been on it, though, and it’s good to know that Humira led to 49% PASI 75.
Compare this to Stelara, which resulted in 70% PASI 75 at 12 weeks, and Taltz, which achieves 90% PASI 75.  Whoa.  Potentially dramatic side effects, potentially dramatic results.
Wait, nothing is 100 PASI 100%?
No.  But combination therapy is pretty amazing.  While the quest for your 100% means using every tool you can get your hands on, it’s possible to get close to something that works a lot all the time.  We at Clarify want to help by making UVB therapy as simple as possible.
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Choosing the Right Doctor, Pt. 3

Choosing the Right Doctor, Pt. 3

This is a continuation from our previous post on Choosing the Right Doctor, part 2. You are in the doctors office now. It’s time to be open and honest. Go over…

doctor-and-patient This is a continuation from our previous post on Choosing the Right Doctor, part 2. You are in the doctors office now. It’s time to be open and honest. Go over the questions you’ve made, the medication you’re on, any side effects you’re experiencing or are concerned with and ask about other treatment options. Remember, all your concerns are valid. “Being open and honest is critically important,” Dr. Evans, a board certified dermatologist in practice at Evans Dermatology in Austin states.  “It can affect your treatment and life. It’s OK to say you don’t understand. We will not think less of you. So it’s vital to be extremely open with us. ” Great communication with doctors has lead to:
  • Lower blood sugar levels in diabetic patients.
  • Lower blood pressure for patients with hypertension.
  • Reduced pain for patients with cancer and other illnesses.
Here are some starter questions to help you along prior to talking to your doctor:
  • When did your psoriasis start?
  • What makes it better or worse?
  • What are your questions and concerns? Are you concerned about surface area, comorbidities, side effects, being able to stick to the treatment?
  • Be precise as possible, which may prevent extra test that may not be necessary.
Now, that you’ve found the right dermatologist, prepared for the visit, are open and honest with your doctor and know your treatment—it’s time to talk about your expectations for the prescribed treatments.
  • What past and current treatments have you been on? What is your level of satisfaction or dissatisfaction with those treatments?
  • What levels of clearance would you be happy with?
  • What type of treatment works with your schedule?
  • What specific areas do you want to target?
  • What side effects are you concerned with?
The doctor has given you a treatment plan. Now, it’s time to stick to it!
  • Give a new treatment at least 8-12 weeks to see if it works with your body.
  • Understand that 50% of all treatment plans are not taken as prescribed by the doctor. It’s important to stick to your treatment to determine its efficacy and whether or not working for you.
  • If symptoms are worsening, be sure to call your doctor immediately.
  • Using the treatment correctly can make a significant difference.
Psoriasis can be a confusing disease in and of itself. So choosing a doctor should be easy. Take these tips along with you next time you’re at the doctor to help get you the care you deserve. Have you found your perfect doctor? What tips helped along the way? We’d love to hear below.  
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Choosing the Right Doctor, Pt. 2

Choosing the Right Doctor, Pt. 2

Choosing the right dermatologist can be overwhelming. Our goal at Skylit is to help make that process a little easier on you. Our last post HERE talked about the basics…

medical_doctor Choosing the right dermatologist can be overwhelming. Our goal at Skylit is to help make that process a little easier on you. Our last post HERE talked about the basics of how to find the right dermatologist and resources to help you. Now we’ll go more in-depth and talk about the questions you should be asking your dermatologist, what to look for, how to prep for the visit and what to expect at each visit.   Recently, I had the honor and privilege of attending the National Psoriasis Foundation’s National Volunteer Conference. I attended multiple informative workshops, met renowned doctors and researchers from around the world who are working to find a cure for psoriasis and psoriatic disease.   I attended a workshop moderated by Dr. Colby Evans, board certified dermatologist in practice at Evans Dermatology in Austin. He spoke on how to have a productive conversation and prepare for each appointment with your doctor.   “Certain dermatologists place more emphasis than others on treating psoriasis and psoriatic disease,” Dr. Evans stated. “It’s important to think about the treatment your dermatologist specializes in.Here are some questions to think about when looking for your dermatologist:  
  • What kind of treatment do they offer?
  • Does the practice focus on research?
  • What is the size of the practice? If it’s smaller, it could mean more one-on-one time with the doctor, but a little longer wait.
  • Is the office a teaching facility versus a practice?
  • What is the personality of the practice? Professional? Laid-back? Top-rated? Mom and pop? Does it fit with your personality?
  • What array of treatments do they offer? Phototherapy, biologics, topical steroids?
  • Are they involved in clinical trials?
  • Will they be able to see you quickly if you have a flare up?
  • Will you see the same doctor each time or a different one?
  After considering these questions, you should be ready to make a decision on what type of dermatologist you’d like to see.   Next, comes your visit. Dr. Evans has some easy steps on prepping for the visit.
  • Think about what you want to get out of the visit. Be upfront and honest with your doctor.
  • Keep and maintain inventory of your medicine to bring with you, including names and dosage.
  • Consider bringing a close friend or family.
  • Other materials to consider to bring:
    • List of past and current treatments
    • How satisfied or dissatisfied you were with your treatments
    • Medical records that include blood work, to eliminate any extra blood work that may not be necessary
    • Contact information of your other doctors: primary care doctor, rheumatologist, etc.
  Once you’ve prepped for the visit, there are several things to consider while waiting for your doctor.
  • Get an early appointment. Either early morning when the office opens, before lunch or after lunch. This eliminates the waiting game and the doctor is more likely to be more focused with you versus being busy with other patients.
  • Expect to wait. The average patient waits at least 19 minutes. If you’re waiting longer, politely check in and ask when the doctor will see you.
  • Stay comfortable and relaxed. Waiting in the doctors office can be nerve wracking. So bring a book, magazine or pull out your iPhone and be patient.
  Finding the right doctor will be the best thing you can do throughout our psoriasis diagnosis. So investing time in finding the right one will be well worth it. Stay tuned on the continuation of this post and what to expect once you get into the doctors office. Don’t forget to check out THIS POST on our very first entry about the basics of finding the right doctor.   Do you have tips on finding the right doctor? What has helped you in the past? Please share below.
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Psoriasis Remission

Psoriasis Remission

What happens after psoriasis “goes away”? Though psoriasis is an incurable disease, it is manageable. There is hope when a treatment actually works and a patient goes into remission.  When…

What happens after psoriasis “goes away”? Though psoriasis is an incurable disease, it is manageable. There is hope when a treatment actually works and a patient goes into remission.  When remission happens, be happy!  Wear short sleeves!  But don’t think the disease is gone and don’t stop treatment entirely. For instance, if you are on phototherapy, you should be transitioning to maintenance treatments rather than aggressive treatment to remove all symptoms. But you still have to treat to keep symptoms away! After a patient has had psoriasis for months or even years, a patient is usually left with lighter colored spots on their skin from where the psoriasis used to be. This is due largely to one thing:
  • Skin cell inflammation temporarily destroys your skins pigment cells called melanocytes
There are many ways to bring your skins pigment back to its original color or close to it. Here are ways to help you through the exciting time of remission:
  • Moisturize and Protect: Just as you moisturize your skin when your flare-ups happen, continue to do so in the remission period. This will help with your skins pigment and color. It also keeps you smooth and hydrated!
  • Exercise and Eat Right: Now’s your chance to show off the new skin and try jogging or heading to the gym. Your psoriasis is in remission, but that doesn’t mean you should throw away all your hard work. Continue to eat a clean and balanced diet with lots of fruits and vegetables and get the recommended 30 mins of aerobic exercise a day
  • Breathe: Since stress is a major trigger for many with psoriasis, it’s important to continue to help ease potential stressors in your life by meditating or taking five deep breaths when you feel stressed out. You can follow the National Psoriasis Foundations three easy steps to stress reduction: https://www.psoriasis.org/life-with-psoriasis/stress
  • Get Outside: The crucial vitamin D activation you get from UVB has been proven to treat and maintain psoriasis symptoms. So enjoy the sun and always use sunscreen. This doesn’t really compare to UVB therapy maintenance, but research shows it works and it certainly helps you get in the mindset to exercise, breathe and reduce stress.
  • Stay in the Know: Continue to educate yourself on psoriasis, triggers, remission and so much more by continuing to come back here or registering for one of these great events with NPF: https://www.psoriasis.org/life-with-psoriasis/stress
Make sure to have regular check-ups with your doctors to ensure your body is healing properly during remission. What has helped you through your remission? Share below.  
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5 Psoriasis Blogs You Need to Know

5 Psoriasis Blogs You Need to Know

    As much information that is out there on psoriasis, you might be asking yourself: Where do you start? Who do you listen to? Are there psoriasis bloggers out…

Screen Shot 2015-05-05 at 8.39.55 AM  
  As much information that is out there on psoriasis, you might be asking yourself: Where do you start? Who do you listen to? Are there psoriasis bloggers out there? What websites have relevant information? We hope that coming to Skylit Medical has answered many of those questions. We’ve compiled a list of the best psoriasis bloggers and how to find them online. If you think we’re missing some, please leave their names in the comments. We’re always looking to connect with more psoriasis bloggers. Alisha Bridges: Being Me In My Own Skin A psoriasis advocate and community ambassador for the National Psoriasis Foundation, Bridges wants others to “come out” and talk about having psoriasis. Bridges has had plaque psoriasis for nearly a decade. She started her blog because she was tired of feeling sorry for herself and wants to help others overcome psoriasis the way she has. http://beingmeinmyownskin.com/ @AlishaMBridges Julie: It’s Just A Bad Day, Not A Bad Life Julie describes her self as a “music, reality TV and fashion-obsessed Mountain Mama” who has overcome meniscus surgery, a myriad of knee issues, severe anxiety and depression and psoriatic arthritis. She always says, “It’s just a bad day, not a bad life.” http://www.itsjustabadday.com/ @justagoodlife Joni Ruth: Just A Girl With Spots Ruth has lived with psoriasis since she was a teenager and started her blog to bring awareness to what psoriasis really is and how to manage it. She wants to get rid of the stigma of psoriasis that “It’s just a skin condition.” http://justagirlwithspots.com/ @GirlWithSpots Todd Bello: Pso What Bello is a proud soccer dad who has lived with psoriasis for more than 20 years. He works closely with the National Psoriasis Foundation as an advocate and brand ambassador to provide more information and raise awareness. https://tvsoccerdad.wordpress.com @tvsoccerdad Sabrina Skiles: Homegrown Houston Skiles has lived with psoriasis for more than 15 years. She started Homegrown Houston as a platform for her love of fashion and how to incorporate living a fashionable life while having psoriasis. Skiles lives by the motto “I don’t let psoriasis define who I am. I define who I am and how I live my life.” http://homegrownhouston.com/ @SabrinaDSkiles
Scaly Scalp Treatment: A Dermatologist’s Tips

Scaly Scalp Treatment: A Dermatologist’s Tips

‘Tis the season for holiday parties, and everyone wants to look their best.  So who wants snowflakes on their shoulders? This blog is for anyone with a scaly scalp, looking…

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5 Simple Tips to Optimize Topical Steroids

5 Simple Tips to Optimize Topical Steroids

With some simple recommendations, we may be able to better optimize topical treatments and enhance outcomes.

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Treatment from the DEAD Sea: Happy Halloween from Clarify

Treatment from the DEAD Sea: Happy Halloween from Clarify

Treatment from the Dead Sea If you are someone who has been diagnosed with psoriasis or vitiligo but concerned about the long list of potential short and long-term effects of…

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Seeking the Truth in Medicine

Seeking the Truth in Medicine

We’d like to introduce you to Charlene Kakimoto MD, Chief Medical Officer at Clarify.  Dr. Kakimoto is a Board Certified Dermatologist who is passionate about making innovation and entrepreneurship fulfill the needs…

Read More
Slow Down and Read This: Stress Can Lead to Flare-Ups

Slow Down and Read This: Stress Can Lead to Flare-Ups

For me, stress and psoriasis have always seem to go hand-in-hand.  I first really noticed my psoriasis when I was carrying a lot of stress, and since then, whenever stress…

Read More
What is PASI?

What is PASI?

You may be reading this because: a) you’ve got psoriasis, and, b) you’ve gone down the Google-search rabbit hole to try and find more information on your lifelong condition only…

Read More
Choosing the Right Doctor, Pt. 3

Choosing the Right Doctor, Pt. 3

This is a continuation from our previous post on Choosing the Right Doctor, part 2. You are in the doctors office now. It’s time to be open and honest. Go over…

Read More
Choosing the Right Doctor, Pt. 2

Choosing the Right Doctor, Pt. 2

Choosing the right dermatologist can be overwhelming. Our goal at Skylit is to help make that process a little easier on you. Our last post HERE talked about the basics…

Read More
Psoriasis Remission

Psoriasis Remission

What happens after psoriasis “goes away”? Though psoriasis is an incurable disease, it is manageable. There is hope when a treatment actually works and a patient goes into remission.  When…

Read More
5 Psoriasis Blogs You Need to Know

5 Psoriasis Blogs You Need to Know

    As much information that is out there on psoriasis, you might be asking yourself: Where do you start? Who do you listen to? Are there psoriasis bloggers out…

Read More


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clarify-logo*The Clarify mobile UVB treatment system is an investigational device in development for use in treating plaque psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo. It has not been cleared by the FDA.

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Clarify is not responsible for, and expressly disclaims all liability for, damages of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance on any information contained within the site. While the information contained within the site is periodically updated, no guarantee is given that the information provided in this web site is correct, complete, and up-to-date. Although the Clarify web site may include links providing direct access to other Internet resources, including Web sites, Clarify is not responsible for the accuracy or content of information contained in these sites. Links from Clarify to third-party sites do not constitute an endorsement by Clarify of the parties or their products and services. The appearance on the web site of advertisements and product or service information does not constitute an endorsement by Clarify, and Clarify has not investigated the claims made by any advertiser. Product information is based solely on material received from suppliers. Mention of brands and use of an images remains trademarks of those respective companies and are for educational purposes only.

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